Review: Mila Air Purifier by Mila Cares

Indoor air purification made affordable!? If you see the competition out there, you will notice that some air purifiers are crazy expensive. Sometimes justified, but most of the time not so much. The problem is that in a modern household we want smart devices that will manage stuff for us automatically and intelligently. Here comes Mila Air, an air purifier for the modern ages in an affordable package.

Mila Air by Mila Cares uses proven techniques to remove air pollutants from your indoor environment such as filters with HEPA H12 or H13 or H14, among others. You choose which one is the best for you. There are many other filter combinations that are ingenuously described by the company in order to make the product more accessible to the everyday folks that want to improve indoor air quality and aren’t experts in the field.

Specifications

  • CADR 245 to 447 m3/hr depends the filter you use
  • Particulate Matter Sensor
  • Carbon Monoxide Sensor
  • tVOC Sensor
  • Temperature and Humidity Sensor
  • Motion Sensor
  • WiFi 2.4GHz
  • Color Display 2.36″

The design of the product is aesthetically very pleasing, which means you can place it anywhere you like. Something to keep in mind is that you get an air purifier and air quality monitor in one device. The purifier is compatible with Alexa and Google Home so you will be able to integrate it in your smart house setup (HomeKit is coming).

At the top of the purifier there is a display and three touch sensitive buttons which allow us to navigate between the automatic or manual mode.

I recommend you to visit their site where they compare Mila against other common air cleaners here.

Filtration

As I mentioned at the beginning of the review, there are various filters to choose from. Mine came with the “The Overreactor” which is a beast of a filter with over 567 grams of Modified Granular Carbon and a HEPA H14 medium, with a rated efficiency of 99.995%. Super robust!

The drawer mechanism which helps us change the filter is so cleverly designed, and it allows the air purifier to draw air from all around. The filter seals well, and if you move the purifier, the filter will stay in its place.

Noise and Power

The noise levels of the air purifier are acceptable at 30% of its total speed, for my auditive standards at least. Something to bear in mind is the fact that different filters will give different noise levels as the purifier doesn’t need so much power in order to draw air in.

The purifier gives you 11 levels of manual speed control, the maximum I have seen so far, so you can adjust the noise and power consumption at your will. Mila focuses on air exchanges per hour rather than fan speed and this is the reason on the display and app you will see values such as 6.1 Air Changes / Hr.

App

The app is fantastic with lots of options and very nice graphs and illustrations. The combination of clever notifications and easy-to-understand elements like the ability to compare indoor air quality against outdoor air quality is fantastic. The app takes data from open source networks like PurpleAir and local official AQ stations to advise you regarding the outdoor conditions. You can choose the outdoor monitor that is more relevant to you and the one you trust the most.

The monitor features air quality sensors, so you can also visualize the measurements from your indoor environment, as seen below.

The app features various automation like the ability to “detox” the air from your bedroom 1h earlier your arrival into the bedroom for sleep. Another automation is the sleep setting which will turn the display of the purifier off and will operate the fan at low speed during your night sleep.

My Experience

The air purifier is very fan to interact with as they have designed the user experience (UX) of the app and hardware in such a way to engage with the users. I always deactivate notifications on my phone but this time I left it on because the messages that I receive feel tailored to me and my needs. Great job 👍

Some of the automation is so well designed but I need to be able to control the device manually sometimes, and my biggest issue was that I couldn’t turn off the display while on manual mode. I am sure they will address it in the future.

Placing an ON/OFF switch on devices that completely cuts them from the grid is not very common nowadays, but it is something that I really appreciate even though it raises the cost of the final BOM and I know it is a hard choice for most companies. 

The team behind the purifier has taken some design choices that I have to bow to in order to show my appreciation. Take a look at the power cord. It is an L-shaped plug from both sides that save space when you want to place the device against the wall or the wall socket is behind a couch and you have to plug the device there. I am sure you have expired that issue with other devices. Bravo 👏

I have been following the steps of the company for a long time and I have noticed their dedication, passion, and customer support. Although Apple is the only platform that I support (at the moment) regarding smart homes, Apple doesn’t make it easy for companies to adopt HomeKit and it is a pain in the butt for developers to make their devices compatible. Mila has tried really hard to make that happen and most likely we will see support in the current generation of the purifier. That said, I would like to ask them once they find time to create a dark theme for the app 🙏

Conclusion

All in all, Mira Air is a great purifier for individuals that need to address personal indoor environments like home offices, bedrooms, study rooms, and general living spaces. The mobile app that is years ahead of the competition and the filters customization deliver a great product experience tailored to your needs. 

2 thoughts on “Review: Mila Air Purifier by Mila Cares

  1. Good review- I was hoping that you would have tested accuracy of the tVOC/CO/Particulate sensors against other known sensor equipment. I love the Mika’s, but am not sure that the sensors are all that accurate.

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